What To Expect

Here are a couple things to be thinking about before starting down this road.

Preparation

In order to make the most of our time together recording your music, there are a few things that *each* member of the band should know:

  • Know the layout of each song (verses, choruses, transitions, etc)
  • Know the Key and approximate tempo of the song
  • At least one of your band members should be able play to a click track
  • Each member should have their instrument prepared to produce the best tone possible (new or conditioned strings and drum heads, all necessary cables/pedals, etc)

We’ll be asking for this information in advance so that we can prepare the session files.

Sessions

Contrary to popular belief, the most productive recording sessions only have 2-3 people involved: at an obvious minimum, the Engineer and the Musician who is performing his/her parts. One additional “producer” role from inside or outside the band may attend to help give artistic direction. Band-mates, friends, and significant others are more frequently a distraction that slows progress rather than helping.

“Fixing”

Before the mix can begin, there’s usually a bit of cleanup to be done – timing and tuning fixes, “comping” multiple takes together, and arranging parts into the right places. Some of this is done on-the-fly during the recording session, but any detailed work and final cuts are typically done by the Engineer alone.

Mixing

Once the tracks are locked, the real mixing process can start! Most of the mix process is done by the Engineer alone, and then a first cut will be delivered. From that point, two rounds of changes are included. Each band member should take note of anything they want changed, and the band should discuss and compile a list. One contact person should communicate changes with the Engineer.

Mastering

The mastering process is an important last step to ensure your mixed tracks translate well to the distribution medium, be that CD, MP3, radio, etc. Mastering sessions are typically done by the Engineer alone, and similar to the Mix process, two rounds of changes are included. Each band member should listen on several playback systems they are familiar with (car, favorite headphones, etc) and make notes. One contact person should communicate changes with the Engineer.

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